Greenslopes Mums Urged to Donate Breast Milk

Australian Red Cross Lifeblood
Photo Credit: Website/ Australian Red Cross Lifeblood

A plea has gone out to mothers in Greenslopes and across South East Queensland with excess breast milk to help critically ill babies.



The Australian Red Cross Lifeblood is facing a critical shortage of donated breast milk, essential for premature and low birthweight babies in the state’s Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs).

Photo Credit: Website/ Australian Red Cross Lifeblood

“Donated breast milk is liquid gold for premature or very sick and small babies,” says Chris Sulfaro, Lifeblood Milk Service Manager. When a mother’s own milk isn’t available, donated breast milk provides vital nutrients and antibodies, helping these fragile infants fight off infections and grow strong.

Currently, Lifeblood supplies 120 litres of milk to 19 Queensland hospitals each month, but with demand on the rise, their freezers are running low. “We’re reliant on milk donations from other states to meet Queensland’s needs,” says Sulfaro. “Ideally, we’d triple the number of donors in Brisbane and the South East to ensure a consistent supply.”

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Photo Credit: Website/ Australian Red Cross Lifeblood

Lifeblood is specifically looking for mothers residing in Brisbane, the Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast, and Ipswich who have an excess of three litres of frozen or expressed milk that are less than 10 weeks old, and meet eligibility criteria.  

The donation process is designed to be convenient for mothers.  Milk can be expressed, frozen, and stored at home or in the hospital, with Lifeblood coordinating pick-up directly.


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“Many mothers in NICUs need a temporary bridge of support while their milk supply establishes,” explains Sulfaro. “Donated breast milk fills that gap, providing the best possible nutrition for these vulnerable babies.”



Milk donor Isha Thanki with her full fridge.
Photo Credit: Website/ Australian Red Cross Lifeblood

Lifeblood’s national milk service distributes donated breast milk to 35 hospitals across Australia. With demand expected to rise from 5500 litres to 6000 litres this year, increasing the donor base in Queensland is crucial.

Mums interested in becoming lifesavers for Queensland’s tiniest patients can find more information and eligibility details at lifeblood.com.au.

Published Date 21-April-2024